How tech packs help your sewing

Hello again! As promised, I will be sending inspirational images from now on. The skirt you see in the photograph is from the very talented Colombian designer Johanna Ortíz. In this garment I love the right selection of the fabric to generate that fall and that volume. Working with patterned fabrics can sometimes be a big challenge, which is why I appreciate seeing designs made from patterned fabric so that I can understand how others work with these fabrics.

Here are some patterns that can be used to sew a skirt of this style:

Simplicity Creative Patterns US8606H5: https://amzn.to/2R8EHhi
McCall’s M7129-B50 Misses’ Skirts: https://amzn.to/2X4xYZs

Today I want to tell you about the use of tech packs in the world of industrial clothing. I currently live in Peru, a mecca of the textile industry. Peru is one of the countries where more clothing is produced, especially for brands abroad. The industrial nature of sewing in the country means that educational centers focus many of their programs towards the industrial sector. That is why, among the courses I have taken on sewing, several have given me tools that are actually used industrially and that I have found very useful within my little world of sewing.

No doubt many of you will have heard of tech packs, and these appear in countless books on home sewing, but I think that for those of us who sew from home, it is a resource that we often ignore and that is quite useful for making in an organized manner and not overlooking anything.

For those who have never seen one, I present to you the clothing tech packs:

Although this first tech pack that I show you is in Spanish, I wanted to show it to you only because it is a very complete tech pack. I’ll translate it for you a little. In the first column we can see the code of the garment (very useful to work with codes even in our little sewing universe), the description of the garment, the notions it carries and the sample section of materials. In the second column we can see the technical drawing of the garment, both from the front and from the back. The purpose of this is to provide the seamstress (or ourselves), all the details that this garment must carry, including the types of seams and finishes. In the last column we can see what that garment looks like in the pattern, that is, “dismembered”.

The usefulness of these tech packs is not necessarily seen at the time of making the garment for which we have created the sheet, but we can see their greatest utility if, over time, we want to repeat a garment that we make or create a similar garment to one that we do. Having tech packs next to our patterns is useful because it saves us time in the medium term.

Commercial patterns include something very similar to the tech pack, which would be the instruction sheet. Anyway, a tech pack is a way to synthesize what we have created and what we are going to sew. It does not mean that on a small scale, it is recommended to make a tech pack as elaborate as the one in the first example I showed you. That first example is 100% industrial in nature, but we can take its essence to create our own tech packs where we write down the most important things for each project. I leave you examples of simpler tech packs that may be useful for you:

These drawings can be much more simplified and in fact do not have to be done on a computer. The important thing is that they are a reference for you, that means that, with your understanding, it is enough.

In yesterday’s email I told you about costs. Tech Packs are an excellent tool to help us determine the costs of our products, because they allow us to centralize on one or two sheets all the information on supplies and materials that we use to create a project.

Go ahead and learn to work with your own tech packs!

Now that you know more about tech packs, it’s time to get back to sewing. Here is my list of recommended sewing accessories and tools. Sometimes inventory can finish really fast, so order them today, and use my affiliate links to get the best prices:

Dressmaker Shears: https://amzn.to/2y8CqMt
Color Head Straight Pins: https://amzn.to/2vLxlJ3
Hand Needles: https://amzn.to/3arV7Jj
Tracing Wheel https://amzn.to/3afF5SF
Thimble: https://amzn.to/3bl9YFg
Pin Cushion “Hedgehog” https://amzn.to/3drvTMU
Professional Tailors Chalk https://amzn.to/2JcJlGI
Bodkin https://amzn.to/2WFQmra
Bias Tape Maker https://amzn.to/33Gtfyc
Buttonhole scissors: https://amzn.to/3dy39Ch
Pinking shears: https://amzn.to/39nhRbS
Thread clipper: https://amzn.to/2xC6UG0
Paper scissors: https://amzn.to/2WRaeYx
AmazonBasics Foldable Storage Bins Cubes Organizer, 6-Pack, Gray https://amzn.to/3bGEs4z  
IRIS USA, Inc. CNL-5 Storage Box, 5 Quart, Clear, 20 Pack https://amzn.to/2WUf6MI
Wall Control 30-P-3232GV Galvanized Steel Pegboard Pack https://amzn.to/3dFvp5M
Simple Houseware Heavy Duty Clothing Garment Rack, Chrome https://amzn.to/3dHC3bW
New Apple iPad (10.2-Inch, Wi-Fi, 32GB) https://amzn.to/33TStJM

With love,
Karina.

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